World Languages

Our World Languages programs develop communicators, linguists, and aficionados of world cultures both past and present. We value training students to understand how languages work but emphasize language as a communicative tool in performing interpretive, presentational, and interpersonal tasks. Such skills are not, however, gained in a vacuum of language study. To communicate effectively, our students also gain insight into and appreciation for the cultures of the people who speak Chinese, French, and Spanish, and read and write Latin. A York World and Classical Language graduate will learn to communicate in cultures that offer surprising differences and share striking similarities to their own cultures.
  • Chinese I

    Chinese I will provide instruction in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It contains eight lessons, which includes a letter, a narrative and seventeen dialogues. The students will learn to use the phonetic system of Pinyin to recognize and reproduce two hundred characters, which make up approximately three hundred and fifty new Chinese words, and to write characters in proper stroke order. Basic radicals are also introduced. Dialogues and simple descriptive/narrative texts cover everyday topics, issues of interest, and idiomatic expressions. The students will learn basic conversational skills like introducing themselves, talking about their families, and providing important information like age, grades, and nationality, etc. The basic sentence patterns and grammatical constructions are also introduced. The students will be able to write short notes, invitations, cards, and simple letters in simplified characters. Class instruction emphasizes situational activities and performance. Through a series of culture-based activities, students not only learn about Chinese culture, but develop a basic awareness of cultural commonality and diversity as well.
  • Chinese II

    After a brief revision of the structures, vocabulary, and characters covered in Chinese I, Chinese II continues to develop students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It usually contains eight lessons, which includes two letters, a diary, and fifteen dialogues on the topics of shopping, talking about the weather, transportation, asking directions, etc. Approximately forty-five new vocabulary items will be introduced in this course. The students will learn serial verbs/ verb phrases, double objects, chule…yiwai…, suiran…keshi/danshi…, structures and patterns, comparative sentences, topic/ comment sentences, reduplication of adjectives, resultative complements, etc. The students will continue to use the phonetic system of Pinyin and will learn to recognize and reproduce an additional three hundred and fifty characters, which make up approximately five hundred and fifty new Chinese words. Students will also learn Chinese calligraphy, poetry, songs, and cuisine
  • Chinese III

    After a brief revision of the structures, vocabulary, and characters covered in Chinese II, Chinese III continues to develop students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, building upon the structure already required in Chinese II. The course usually contains nine lessons, which include four narratives and fourteen dialogues. The students will learn an additional three hundred and fifty characters, which make up approximately six hundred new Chinese words. In addition to completing and reviewing basic grammar and key sentence patterns, sixty new grammar items will also be introduced. While the learning of structure patterns is a major component of the course, efforts will be made to help students handle simple tasks such as discussing daily routines, going to school, sports, shopping, dining, vacationing, etc, and to write notes and letters. Activities designed for the course include both deductive and inductive lectures on grammatical constructions and culture conventions as they relate to the language. In addition, intensive drills on sounds and tones, vocabulary, and sentence patterns in meaningful contexts will be used in order for the students to communicate appropriately and accurately in authentic contexts. Both pedagogical prepared texts and authentic materials will be used in this course. For the reading and writing tracks, emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of character recurring components in order to systematically improve students’ Chinese orthographic awareness.
  • Chinese III Honors

    After a brief revision of the structures, vocabulary, and characters covered in Chinese II, Chinese III Honors continues to develop students’ abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, building upon the structure already required in Chinese II. The course usually contains nine lessons, which include four narratives and fourteen dialogues. The students will learn an additional three hundred and fifty characters, which make up approximately six hundred new Chinese words. In addition to completing and reviewing basic grammar and key sentence patterns, sixty new grammar items will also be introduced. While the learning of structure patterns is a major component of the course, efforts will be made to help students handle simple tasks such as discussing daily routines, going to school, sports, shopping, dining, vacationing, etc, and to write notes and letters. Activities designed for the course include both deductive and inductive lectures on grammatical constructions and culture conventions as they relate to the language. In addition, intensive drills on sounds and tones, vocabulary, and sentence patterns in meaningful contexts will be used in order for the students to communicate appropriately and accurately in authentic contexts. Both pedagogical prepared texts and authentic materials will be used in this course. For the reading and writing tracks, emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of character recurring components in order to systematically improve students’ Chinese orthographic awareness. While Chinese III Honors covers linguistic and cultural topics in greater depth, its scope is also much broader and includes numerous abstract and challenging enrichment topics. As a result, Chinese III Honors is intended for students who have a strong interest and aptitude for language learning, and who are ready, willing, and able to do the work necessary to tackle demanding communicative tasks at an accelerated pace.
  • Chinese IV

    This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Chinese III course or who can demonstrate that they have acquired a knowledge of the language to the required level. This course will continue to help students develop their five language skills of aurally understanding, speaking, reading, writing, and computer communication from an intermediate level to an advanced level. The course contains fifteen lessons which fifteen narratives, fifteen dialogues and twelve readings on various topics. Many of the grammatical constructions introduced in previous Chinese courses will be repeated in this course with increasing sophistication in terms of style and usage. While many of the linguistic tasks the students are required to handle are similar to those of the previous years of Chinese, the level of language required to carry out those tasks are more advanced. New sentence structures and many important words and phrases will be introduced in this course. The students will expand their vocabulary from fifteen hundred to two thousand three hundred words (Approx.). They will have stronger aural-oral skills to carry out conversations on diverse topics with a wide range of vocabulary and culture appropriateness as well as writing skills, with grammatical accuracy, and reading skills to comprehend authentic materials.In this course, students are required to produce paragraph-level Chinese with accuracy and fluency. The classes are made up of lecture sessions, drill practice, discussions, reading comprehension practice, listening comprehension practice, situation dialogue practice, and language games. Class will be conducted in Mandarin Chinese.
  • Chinese V: Business Chinese

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Chinese beyond Chinese IV should speak with the Chinese teacher and Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • Chinese VI

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Chinese beyond Chinese IV should speak with the Chinese teacher and Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • French I

    French I students begin to acquire the unique sounds of French, and then, it's all about them. They become proficient communicators about their likes, their looks, their lives, and learn to ask the people around them about the same. By the end of French I, students can ask for favors, give invitations, mention what they do on a regular basis, what they already did, and what they're going to do. Fun French-speaking projects include the publishing of a family album, the staging of a French café scene, the production of a fashion show, and the design of a staged dream home for homebuyers.
  • French II

    French II students communicate about the spaces, activities, responsibilities, and diversions that are observed in not only their lives, but in the cultures of French-speaking people. They become proficient communicators about holidays and celebrations, schooling, health and wellness, natural spaces, shopping for and preparing food, tourism and travel, arts and entertainment. By the end of French II, students can narrate past events, give advice, hypothesize, talk about future plans, and describe their daily routines. Fun French-speaking projects include the publishing of a tourism video and brochure, the staging of a marketplace interaction, a book and film vlog, and a virtual tour of some of the highlights of the Monterey Peninsula.
  • French III

    The students starting French III have previously gained proficiency that allows them to communicate their personal experience and take part in the daily interactions common to all cultures. Their goal in this course is to add some sophistication to their linguistic prowess and topics of conversation. Among the themes explored are environmental concerns, the structure of governments, the workplace, emergency services, and the press. In French III, students are introduced to two classic works of fiction edited for learners -- La planète des singes (The Planet of the Apes) and Cyrano de Bergerac. A unit on Francophone African fables provides the students with the opportunity to compare and contrast literary traditions of Western Europe and nations of Africa. Fun French-speaking projects include the publishing of a C.V., the creating of a found artifact to complement an analysis of The Planet of the Apes, and a current events and news television broadcast.
  • French III Honors

    The students starting French III have previously gained proficiency that allows them to communicate their personal experience and take part in the daily interactions common to all cultures. Their goal in this course is to add some sophistication to their linguistic prowess and topics of conversation. Among the themes explored are environmental concerns, the structure of governments, the workplace, emergency services, and the press. In French III, students are introduced to two classic works of fiction edited for learners -- La planète des singes (The Planet of the Apes) and Cyrano de Bergerac. A unit on Francophone African fables provides the students with the opportunity to compare and contrast literary traditions of Western Europe and nations of Africa. Fun French-speaking projects include the publishing of a C.V., the creating of a found artifact to complement an analysis of The Planet of the Apes, and a current events and news television broadcast. French III Honors covers linguistic and cultural topics in greater depth, its scope is also much broader and includes numerous abstract and challenging enrichment topics. As a result, French III Honors is intended for students who have a strong interest and aptitude for language learning, and who are ready, willing, and able to do the work necessary to tackle demanding communication tasks at an accelerated pace.
  • French IV

    French IV Honors York Advanced Studies students not only fine-tune and polish their communication skills, but they also now use French as a tool to explore topics common to the human experience. We keep current with news in the Francophone world by watching news clips and reading articles designed for native-speaking adolescents.Through the lens of film, novel, and short story, our students encounter celebrated French language histoires d'adolescence (child and teenaged protagonists). Students analyze, debate, produce art, and write their own stories as they encounter themes of building independence, finding one's voice, falling in love, owning mistakes, building friendships, and just plain living the teenaged dream. A capstone project has the students interview and immortalize a story of one of the Monterey Peninsula's local French speakers.
  • French V

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of French beyond French IV should speak with the French teacher and Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • Latin I

    The Cambridge Latin Series brings students quickly to the point where they can read Latin with confidence and gain some insight into life in the early Roman Empire by participating in the daily lives of the Caecilius family. Exercises of various types reinforce grammar and vocabulary, strengthening vocabulary skills in English through the study of derivatives and cognates. All four-language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) are reinforced. Cultural themes include the family, the treatment of slaves, education, the baths, hospitality, and the city of Pompeii in 79 BCE.
  • Latin II

    Latin II is a continuation of the Cambridge Latin Series. New linguistic material is introduced as well as new vocabulary, morphology, idiom, structure, and syntax. The story shifts to Britain and then to Rome during the reign of Domitian. The class also builds upon its basic framework of Roman culture by studying government, religion, treatment of provincials, et al. Towards the end of the year, students begin to translate some unmodified passages from Classical Latin authors.
  • Latin III

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Latin beyond Latin II should speak with the Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • Latin IV

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Latin beyond Latin II should speak with the Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • Latin V

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Latin beyond Latin II should speak with the Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • Spanish I

    Spanish I students start their language learning process acquiring basic knowledge that helps them share biographical information, their likes and dislikes, give informal commands and describe simple actions in the past. In addition, they will learn interrogative words, adjective and noun agreement, the use of Ser and Estar and the present tense of stem-changing verbs and irregular verbs. By the end of Spanish I, students will be able to introduce themselves, talk about their likes and dislikes and express what they have done in the past by using the simple past tense and give informal commands. Moreover, students wilI be able to request information, describe places, and express existence and location. In order to achieve these goals, we will be using the textbook Pura Vida, second edition. Its variety of resources such as videos, interactive vocabulary presentations allows students to acquire the language and Hispanic culture in the context of real-life stories.
  • Spanish II

    Spanish II students will learn to use preterite and imperfect tense, how to use irregular and stem-changing verbs in the past. Also, students will study negative and indefinite words, and they will be introduced to the subjunctive. In addition, they will learn to use reflexive verbs and to talk about their daily routine. Moreover, students will study the difference of saber and conocer, the use of Indirect Object Pronoun and Direct Object Pronoun, the preterit tense of ser and ir and other irregular verbs, and they will learn to differentiate between imperfect tense and preterit. Finally, they will be introduced to the subjunctive mood. By the end of Spanish II students will be able to express for whom they do something, narrate events in past and describe how life used to be, and they will be able to give formal commands. In order to achieve these goals, we will be using the textbook Pura Vida, second edition. Its variety of resources such as videos, interactive vocabulary presentations allows students to acquire the language and Hispanic culture in the context of real life stories.
  • Spanish III

    Spanish III students will learn to use the of present subjunctive with impersonal expressions, verbs of emotion, expressions of doubts, etc. Also, they will learn the present perfect, the particle used as adjectives and the future tense. Moreover, they will be introduced to the imperfect subjunctive and the conditional tense. By the end of Spanish III students will be able talk about the future, express doubts, express desires and hopes and uncertainty. Further, they will be to describe emotions and changes of state, discuss hypothetical situations and subjectivity in the past. In order to achieve these goals, we will be using the textbook Pura Vida, second edition. Its variety of resources such as videos, interactive vocabulary presentations allows students to acquire the language and Hispanic culture in the context of real life stories.
  • Spanish III Honors

    Spanish III Honors students will learn to use the of present subjunctive with impersonal expressions, verbs of emotion, expressions of doubts, etc. Also, they will learn the present perfect, the particle used as adjectives and the future tense. Moreover, they will be introduced to the imperfect subjunctive and the conditional tense. By the end of Spanish III Honors students will be able talk about the future, express doubts, express desires and hopes and uncertainty. Further, they will be to describe emotions and changes of state, discuss hypothetical situations and subjectivity in the past. In order to achieve these goals, we will be using the textbook Pura Vida, second edition. Its variety of resources such as videos, interactive vocabulary presentations allows students to acquire the language and Hispanic culture in the context of real life stories. While Spanish III Honors covers linguistic and cultural topics in greater depth, its scope is also much broader and includes numerous abstract and challenging enrichment topics. As a result, Spanish III Honors is intended for students who have a strong interest and aptitude for language learning, and who are ready, willing, and able to do the work necessary to tackle demanding communicative tasks at an accelerated pace.
  • Spanish IV

    Spanish IV students will review different grammar structures that they studied in Spanish I, II, and III. Moreover, they will be immersed in the Hispanic literature, which will take them in journey that will begin in the Medieval Spanish Age and will stop in the Spanish Romanticism during the XIX century. By the end of Spanish IV, students will be able to write and talk about different topics and present their points of view in the target language. In addition, they will be able to discuss and analyze the main topics of different literature works in Spanish. In order to achieve these goals we will be using Repase y escriba to review grammar, and we will use online sources such as Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes to access different literary works.
  • Spanish V

    Spanish V students will continue the journey they started in Spanish IV. We will be reviewing some grammar structures and also will continue reading and analyzing different literary works in the target language. In Spanish V students will begin in the Spanish Realism Period, at the end of the XIX century, and will hopefully take through the Latin American Boom. In order to achieve these goals we will be using Repase y escriba to review grammar, and we will use online sources such as Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes to access different literary works.
  • Spanish VI

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Spanish beyond Spanish V should speak with the Spanish teachers and Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • YAS Chinese IV

    This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Chinese III course or who can demonstrate that they have acquired a knowledge of the language to the required level. This course will continue to help students develop their five language skills of aurally understanding, speaking, reading, writing, and computer communication from an intermediate level to an advanced level. The course contains fifteen lessons which fifteen narratives, fifteen dialogues and twelve readings on various topics. Many of the grammatical constructions introduced in previous Chinese courses will be repeated in this course with increasing sophistication in terms of style and usage. While many of the linguistic tasks the students are required to handle are similar to those of the previous years of Chinese, the level of language required to carry out those tasks are more advanced. New sentence structures and many important words and phrases will be introduced in this course. The students will expand their vocabulary from fifteen hundred to two thousand three hundred words (Approx.). They will have stronger aural-oral skills to carry out conversations on diverse topics with a wide range of vocabulary and culture appropriateness as well as writing skills, with grammatical accuracy, and reading skills to comprehend authentic materials.In this course, students are required to produce paragraph-level Chinese with accuracy and fluency. The classes are made up of lecture sessions, drill practice, discussions, reading comprehension practice, listening comprehension practice, situation dialogue practice, and language games. Class will be conducted in Mandarin Chinese. While Chinese IV Honors YAS covers linguistic and cultural topics in greater depth, its scope is also much broader and includes numerous abstract and challenging enrichment topics. As a result, Chinese IV Honors YAS is intended for students who have a strong interest and aptitude for language learning, and who are ready, willing, and able to do the work necessary to tackle demanding communicative tasks at an accelerated pace.
  • YAS French IV

    French IV Honors York Advanced Studies students not only fine-tune and polish their communication skills, but they also now use French as a tool to explore topics common to the human experience. We keep current with news in the Francophone world by watching news clips and reading articles designed for native-speaking adolescents.Through the lens of film, novel, and short story, our students encounter celebrated French language histoires d'adolescence (child and teenaged protagonists). Students analyze, debate, produce art, and write their own stories as they encounter themes of building independence, finding one's voice, falling in love, owning mistakes, building friendships, and just plain living the teenaged dream. A capstone project has the students interview and immortalize a story of one of the Monterey Peninsula's local French speakers.
  • YAS Latin IV

    Students who are qualified and interested in extending their study of Latin beyond Latin II should speak with the Director of Teaching and Learning.
  • YAS Spanish IV

    Spanish IV Honors YAS students will review different grammar structures that they studied in Spanish I, II, and III. Moreover, they will be immersed in the Hispanic literature, which will take them in journey that will begin in the Medieval Spanish Age and will stop in the Spanish Romanticism during the XIX century. By the end of Spanish IV Honors YAS, students will be able to write and talk about different topics and present their points of view in the target language. In addition, they will be able to discuss and analyze the main topics of different literature works in Spanish. In order to achieve these goals we will be using Repase y escriba to review grammar, and we will use online sources such as Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes to access different literary works. While Spanish IV Honors YAS covers linguistic and cultural topics in greater depth, its scope is also much broader and includes numerous abstract and challenging enrichment topics. As a result, Spanish IV Honors YAS is intended for students who have a strong interest and aptitude for language learning, and who are ready, willing, and able to do the work necessary to tackle demanding communication tasks at an accelerated pace.
  • YAS Spanish V

    Spanish V Honors YAS students will continue the journey they started in Spanish IV. We will be reviewing some grammar structures and also will continue reading and analyzing different literary works in the target language. In Spanish V Honors, students will begin in the Spanish Realism Period, at the end of the XIX century, and will hopefully take through the Latin American Boom. In order to achieve these goals we will be using Repase y escriba to review grammar, and we will use online sources such as Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes to access different literary works. While Spanish V Honors YAS covers linguistic and cultural topics in greater depth, its scope is also much broader and includes numerous abstract and challenging enrichment topics. As a result, Spanish V Honors YAS is intended for students who have a strong interest and aptitude for language learning, and who are ready, willing, and able to do the work necessary to tackle demanding communication tasks at an accelerated pace.

Faculty

  • Photo of John Daniel
    John Daniel
    World & Classical Languages Department Chair, French, Student Council Advisor
    Bio
  • Photo of Lei-Lei Bates
    Lei-Lei Bates
    Chinese
    Bio
  • Photo of Leah Chirinos-Aleman
    Leah Chirinos-Aleman
    Spanish
    Bio
  • Photo of Pamela Clemens
    Pamela Clemens
    Latin, International Student Dean
    Bio
  • Photo of Alexis Giachetti
    Alexis Giachetti
    Cinema, Global Studies, History, Spanish
    Bio

Curriculum

York School

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Phone: 831-372-7338
Fax: 831-372-8055
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